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Knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary health care workers on zoonotic diseases in Bukonzo County, Kasese District

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dc.contributor.author Asiimwe, Benon B.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-13T01:26:11Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-13T01:26:11Z
dc.date.issued 2015-11
dc.identifier.citation Asiimwe, B. B. (2015). Knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary health care workers on zoonotic diseases in Bukonzo County, Kasese District. Unpublished master's thesis, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10570/5711
dc.description A dissertation submitted to the Directorate of Research and Graduate Training in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Award of the Degree of Masters of Public Health of Makerere University en_US
dc.description.abstract Background Many factors, including lack of knowledge, have been mentioned as contributing to underdiagnosis and underreporting of zoonotic diseases particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. It is important to understand what health care workers in endemic settings know, as well as their attitudes and practices regarding these diseases. Objective To determine knowledge of primary health care workers in Kasese district regarding common Anthrax, Brucellosis, Rabies, Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers, as well as assess attitudes and practices of the health care workers (HCWs) regarding these zoonoses. Method A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 140 HCWs from five health centers in Bukonzo County using a semi-structured questionnaire. To be knowledgeable about a particular zoonosis, a HCW had to know the causative agent, key clinical symptoms and main transmission routes of the disease, while attitudes were assessed using the Likert scale of agreement. Results There was a total lack of overall knowledge (0%) of anthrax and Ebola among all the 140 HCWs; there was poor overall knowledge of brucellosis where only 2/140 (1.4%) were knowledgeable; 5/140 (3.6%) were knowledgeable for rabies while 9/140 (6.4%) PHCWs were knowledgeable for Marburg. Most (71.8%) HCWs always include zoonoses prevention messages in their routine practice; 84.3% recommended curricular in schools of health professionals to include zoonoses; 77.1% thought that specialists should be trained and deployed in high risk areas so as to manage these diseases, while only 45% had ever managed a zoonotic disease. Conclusion There was poor overall knowledge, good attitudes towards management and information dissemination regarding zoonoses and poor practices regarding management among HCWs in Bukonzo County, Kasese district. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Makerere University en_US
dc.subject Zoonotic diseases en_US
dc.subject Primary health care workers en_US
dc.subject Clinical symptoms en_US
dc.title Knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary health care workers on zoonotic diseases in Bukonzo County, Kasese District en_US
dc.type Thesis/Dissertation (Masters) en_US


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